Location

D.C. Preservation League
401 F Street, NW Room 324
Washington, DC, 20001

Phone: 202-783-5144
Fax: 202-783-5596

See map: Google Maps

Who We Are

The D.C. Preservation League was founded as "Don't Tear It Down" in 1971 to prevent the demolition of historic buildings in Washington's downtown. The organization's early efforts focused on saving the Old Post Office and the Willard Hotel on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Since prevailing in those struggles, DCPL has gone on to save more than 100 individual historic buildings, many of which were slated for demolition. DCPL has also surveyed and initiated the designation and preservation of several historic neighborhoods.

DCPL has also conducted six important thematic inventories of specific building types throughout the city, such as apartment buildings, banks, office buildings, schools, transportation-related resources, and warehouses. These surveys contribute substantially to a growing body of documentation on local history and provide the basis for landmark designation and protection.

DCPL sponsors lecture series, tours, and citywide preservation conferences that have attracted hundreds of people. DCPL has organized the Coalition for Greater Preservation Enforcement, now the Historic Districts Coalition, a group of more than 30 civic organizations concerned with the District's enforcement of existing laws and regulations for protected neighborhoods.

DCPL is a 501(c)(3) membership organization governed by a working board of 20 civic activists and administered by a small staff. DCPL's support comes primarily from the contributions of a loyal membership and from corporations and foundations concerned about the preservation of the built environment.

http://www.dcpreservation.org/


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